doc ß reader A House of Many Mansions The History of Lebanon Reconsidered ☆ 9780520071964 Õ horticulturetrader


reader A House of Many Mansions The History of Lebanon Reconsidered

doc ß reader A House of Many Mansions The History of Lebanon Reconsidered ☆ 9780520071964 Õ horticulturetrader Í [Reading] ➿ A House of Many Mansions The History of Lebanon Reconsidered ➶ Kamal Salibi – Horticulturetrader.co.uk Des remarkable insights into the dynamic of Lebanon's recent conflict In so doing he illuminates important facets of his country's present and future This book also gives a masterly account of how the imagined communities that underlie modern nationalism are created and will be of interest to students of international affairs as well as Near Eastern scholar This book is definitely interesting but not as a primary historical account Instead it is a challenge to some of the false public perceptions that have seeped through the Lebanese mindsetsAlthough it is not a completely revolutionary reconsideration of Lebanese history it definitely challenges some popular and sometimes mainstream notions Some examples are that the Lebanese are phoenician and not arab that Mount Lebanon is a historical refuge for religious minorities that Lebanon was truly uniue during Ottoman rule that the Lebanese have historically been a beacon of hope and progress in the Orient The author suggests a historical context for every one of these suppositions to show that they are at least partially falseI think it is an important read for most Lebanese and in a way a call to reconsider history

A House of Many Mansions The History of Lebanon ReconsideredDes remarkable insights into the dynamic of Lebanon's recent conflict In so doing he illuminates important facets of his country's present and future This book also gives a masterly account of how the imagined communities that underlie modern nationalism are created and will be of interest to students of international affairs as well as Near Eastern scholar This book is definitely interesting but not as a primary historical account Instead it is a challenge to some of the false public perceptions that have seeped through the Lebanese mindsetsAlthough it is not a completely revolutionary reconsideration of Lebanese history it definitely challenges some popular and sometimes mainstream notions Some examples are that the Lebanese are phoenician and not arab that Mount Lebanon is a historical refuge for religious minorities that Lebanon was truly uniue during Ottoman rule that the Lebanese have historically been a beacon of hope and progress in the Orient The author suggests a historical context for every one of these suppositions to show that they are at least partially falseI think it is an important read for most Lebanese and in a way a call to reconsider history

eBook ↠ A House of Many Mansions The History of Lebanon Reconsidered è Kamal Salibi

A House of Many Mansions The History of Lebanon Reconsidered Á Today Lebanon is one of the world's most divided countries But paradoxically the faction ridden Lebanese both Christians and Muslims have never shown a keener consciousness of common identity How can this be? In the light of modern scholarship a famous Lebanese writer and scholar examines the historical myths on which his country's warring communities have Kamal Salibi’s A House of Many Mansions is a comprehensive history of the geographic area now referred to as “Lebanon” It aims to dispel the misinformation about the region’s past that has arisen since it became a nation in 1920 Salibi’s central idea is that violent conflict in Lebanon will not stop until its inhabitants come to consensus on the nation’s past but he is optimistic because despite the decade long Civil War at the time “there has not been a time when the Muslims and Christians of Lebanon have exhibited on the whole a keener consciousness of common identity” His objective therefore is to determine why this isA large portion of Salibi’s work is devoted to reviewing the history of “Lebanon” and sorting out the historicity of both Christian and Muslim claims An expert in his subject matter Salibi is able to provide the reader with a vast array of information From the evidence he argues that it is anachronistic for Arab nationalists to claim that Lebanon was ever part of Syria prior to 1920 Instead the Lebanese region should be seen as having developed somewhat independently of Greater Syria Two major communities Muslim Druze and Maronite Christians grew powerful in the region with the former dominating for many years particularly under the rule of the Maan family The Maronites however “at every stage in their history managed to accommodate to the prevailing political conditions in a manner which secured for them a privileged position” and soon they were able to leverage their connections among other things to gain the upper hand under the Shihabi dynastyWith that said however Salibi rejects Henri Lammens’ famous conception of Lebanon as having a historical identity as a refuge for persecuted Syrians a notion that was used by the French during the mandatory period to justify their creation of an independent state He also discredits the idea of Phoenicianism Lebanon as having had a distinct continual historical identity since the time of the Phoenicians demonstrating that “between ancient Phoenicia and the Lebanon of medieval and modern times there is no demonstrable historical connection” and “not a single institution or tradition of medieval or modern Lebanon can be legitimately traced back to ancient Phoenicia” Throughout his book he makes an effort to dispel many others myths old and new about the history of the region He denies for example that two of the most important figures Fakhir al din Maan and Bashir Shihab II could be considered founders of a modern Lebanon arguing that both were strongmen and functionaries of the Ottoman Empire and that their autonomy and feudal organization has been exaggerated Salibi argues that since the founding of the Lebanese state the locus of conflict has been the ideological and often physical battle between Arab nationalism and Lebanism Lebanese citizens and leaders alike were concerned with the “game” of Lebanese politics than national interests while government representatives ignored constituents to cater to the demands of capitalist investors In a system fractured by tribalism these representatives then blamed hostility from other sects for the dearth of progress in their own constituencies A lack of a common vision of the past has hindered the development of a sense of political community but Salibi concludes that based on an honest examination of the region’s past there exists a foundation for a unified national history With the realization that neither side can force their version of the past on the other plus Arab concessions to Lebanon existing in the form it does today “one need not invent a special history for Lebanon” Christian Arabs he argues have in common with Muslim Arabs than Western Christians with a history that cannot be understood outside of the Islamic context and this relationship is what forms the base of the Lebanese state It is this understanding he argues that is necessary for the nation to move forward and put a final stop to its internal conflictsSalibi is well versed in his subject matter and presents large amounts of information in uick succession which can make it difficult to retain without careful note taking Unlike other information heavy texts however such as Albert Hourani’s Arabic Thought in the Liberal Age Salibi’s work has easily identifiable underlying arguments and themes that aid in comprehension and the general narrative is accessible and easy to pick up There is also a helpful although arguably not sufficient amount of repetition and signposting throughout the book and his concluding chapter does an excellent job of summarizing his main points Overall Salibi’s style is easy to digest making this a rare example of a complex detailed work that is not overwhelming While it has been argued that the author reduces the issues in Lebanon to a level that is oversimplified those unfamiliar with the history of the region will find A House of Many Mansions to be a balanced and intelligible perspective on Lebanon its civil war and its history even if the amount of detail can seem at times daunting eBook ↠ A House of Many Mansions The History of Lebanon Reconsidered è Kamal Salibi

Kamal Salibi è A House of Many Mansions The History of Lebanon Reconsidered reader

Kamal Salibi è A House of Many Mansions The History of Lebanon Reconsidered reader Based their conflicting visions of the Lebanese nation He shows that Lebanon cannot afford this divisiveness that in order to develop and maintain a sense of political unity it is necesary to distinuish fact from fiction and then build on what is real in the common experience of both groupsSalibi offers a major reinterpretation of Lebanese history and provi political twisting of history specially against maronites and trying to dissolve lebanese identity into arab identity enjoyable none the less